Meno-L-ogging; Make Your Mark

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Lekhyaarudha - committed to writing

This being the thirteenth, and therefore the half-way post of the A - Z 'monthathon', it is perhaps fitting I chose this word. Purely for the act of committing so much to writing thus far and with the promise of more to complete the set! However, as this series is about self-development and spiritual (philosophical if you prefer that term) intention, then you will surmise that there is a little more to explore.

At surface value, the word tells us that we are taking a story or concept and giving it an external expression. Writing is a gift of communication that only the human species utilises. Other animals use scent trails to communicate with others they may never see or meet, but the human critter alone can create patterns that can be read and understood through countless years and centuries. It is not just the patterns themselves, but the sounds attached to them which form the mental picture within us that conveys the essence contained within the writing. Yes, it will come down to images in the end! It is impossible, for example, to read the word 'writing' and not have first the sound of it enter our minds and then a mental image of a page with lots of rhythmic patterns on it!

Any who choose to commit their thoughts to the blank page will know that it takes some effort. Beyond that effort, there may also be some level of courage required. Courage? Indeed. Talking aloud is one thing. It is done in the presence of others where one can immediately gauge the response to what has been said, and there can be interaction and an expansion of the thoughts according to that immediate environment.

Writing those same thoughts down, however, is done in isolation. Then there is the perception that once it is committed to the page and has been published (regardless of the format), that the words are set, unchangeable. Depending on the medium, any response will be delayed to some greater or lesser degree. Any counter-response is that much more demanding, as it has to try and erase any misinterpretation or misunderstanding which may arise. Writing, by its very process, ought to give space to the writer to formulate their thoughts, to edit their words and to ensure that they are giving the best they can at that moment. However, modern written communication channels have tended to erode this quality and sacrificed it to quantity!

There are endless reasons to commit to writing; here, though, our purpose is Higher Calling. Back on track, then, with the self-evolvement through writing… a Sanskrit technique used for focus and devotion is 'likhiita jaapa'. Repeated writing. With this, the writer takes a blank page and a favourite pen and finds a place to sit in peace in order to focus only on that page and the process of writing. A word or phrase is taken up for concentration. For example, 'May There Be Focus', or 'The Lord is My Shepherd', or 'Jaya Shri Ram'… the word or phrase needs to be something which raises the internal 'vibration'. Carefully, deliberately, the pen is placed upon the page, and the first phrase is formed. It should be done with full attention to the flow of the pen, the pencraft itself. There should be no hurry. Then it gets repeated until the page is filled.

At completion, you may be surprised to find that a pattern has developed from the whole, as well as within the completed phrases. Once focus and concentration are coming more naturally in this process, it is possible to start playing with it, forming pictures with your calligraphy - but at no time lose the focus of the pen touching the paper, the ink flowing. Do not be tempted to side-track and begin doodling or changing pens for colour. This is not an art project. It is an exercise in full focus, dedication to task and commitment.

The benefit which will be felt with dedicated use of this technique is a mind which feels more still, more single-pointed and ready to think about other matters with a raised attention. If this benefit is not being felt, the exercise is not receiving the focus it deserves.

Have you the commitment to commit to writing?


11 comments:

  1. Ohhh the art work is splendid.
    YAM I really really enjoy writing but alas. My skills are in writing what comes right out of my mind and not always with the best organization. Madi is my muse and we all know there is a party in my head. But I make an effort anyway.
    Hugs HiC

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  2. I always find the best focus for my writing comes when I think of the characters and the world I'm creating rather than repeat a mantra phrase. once I know a character well enough to be telling their story, I often find the writing pretty much takes care of itself
    Debbie

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    1. Hari OM
      ...well yes... but the purpose of likhiita is meditation and spiritual focus... it is devotional calligraphy and assists those who have difficulty in straightforward meditation. Yxx

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  3. Wow that word is a tongue twister, but if it means writing down your thoughts then I guess I like it. You are so right about verbal communication being easier than the written version at times - I wrote a post in May last year about how I felt about Mothers Day - my daughter completely misinterpreted it - took it as a judgement and read so much into it that hadn't crossed my mind. She cut off communication for months and it was a long, slow process back to relationship again - a very valuable lesson learned - you never know how other people will interpret what you write and whether they'll choose to be offended!

    Leanne | www.crestingthehill.com.au
    L for Love Yourself

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    1. Hari OM
      Leanne, we can write as clearly and as cleanly as possible, but here, as well as face to face, regardless of that care, we cannot account for the way another will receive it. Yes, we have experience and general guides as to what will work for the majority, but there will always be a variance in the receipt what is said or seen. I know that you discovered this for yourself... it is always regrettable, though, when it is someone close who 'takes the strunts' (one of my granny's favourite phrases for a foot-stamper!). What is at play is the role of karma, praarabdha as well as any immediate experience in direct relationship to the subject being reacted to. Sometimes those reactions can leave the writer/speaker baffled... Yxx

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  4. I would definitely like to try likhiita jaapa soon. Thanks for this inspiring post :)

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  5. Likhita japa is very familiar - many family members used this practice. A favourite uncle used to write Durganaam everyday 108 times, now gone many years. Fond memories! Thanks for nudging them with your post.

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  6. Hello, I am visiting from the A2Z challenge. I am intrigued by the practice of likhiita jaapa and am going to investigate it further.
    My writing has taken a backseat to other things during the last year. I choose to do this challenge each year to reign me back into writing. I love to write for so many reasons and miss it when I am away from it.

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    1. Hari OM
      Dear Lynda
      Thank you for your visit.
      Likhiita jaapa (I double the letters in transliteration so that unfamiliar readers can pronounce more correctly) is a wonderfully stilling and centring practice to start or end a day. You can read a full discussion and see examples HERE... additionally, there are some wonderful images of advanced likhiita to be found. Of course, Devanagari script lends itself to such, but there is no reason why one cannot use a word in English and create it beautifully. You could 'knit' the letters (ahem &*> yes I've been reading you!) Yxx

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  7. I love to talk and talk and talk, i don't like to write. when I write my post, it is not really writing, it is talking in written form... but i do love to READ what my favorite writers write, but it is the story that grabs me and i am always amazed at how one writer can tell a story and another the same story and one captures me and the other doesn't.. writing is a gift and i did not get that gift. i also find that when reading a sentence as in an email or comment, it is much harder to really understand what is said than if the same thing was said face to face. our body language and our facial expressions make it different. in my work place we were told to be very careful when sending emails because sometimes the words only could be taken the wrong way.

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  8. Of late my desire to write is almost non existent. namaste, janice xx

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